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. what everyone is talking about is bob costas' reaction during the sunday night football game. first he started out unobjectible, poignant and he usually is. >> in the aftermath of the unphattible eventsunfathomable events in kansas city. this really puts everything in perspective. if so that perspective has a short shelf life since we'll hear about the perspective we'll regain the next time ugly reality intrudes upon our games. those who need tragedies to recalibrate their sense of proportion with sports would seem to have little hope of truly achieving perspective. >> cenk: i love that. it goes beyond saying he's right, this gives us perspective, and then we forget that lesson. but it applies to the lessons learned from any of these tragedyies. speak of any tragedies the other side said you politicize things. >> ensures more and more domestic disputes will end in the ultimate tragedy and more convenient store confrontations will leave more teenage boys bloodied and dead. handguns do not enhance our safety. they bring out flews and bait us in embracing confrontation rather than avoidin
that the economies matter. i think whether it's been leon panetta, bob gates, admiral mullen, the constant focus on economic feminism, i don't know canada's net position with china, but it does raise this fundamental question of whether american debt is an asset or a liability. you know, the conference in dallas yesterday were recently, where someone made a comment that an american source of power to every different in the past that it defies the pentagon and the size american debt that we're too big to fail. deadhorse lake bigger problem than us. i be interested when you're anything about policy do you look at that as a source of leverage or does it strain american options tremendous a? >> steve, very simply, the u.s. situation with respect to our deficit and debt is a national security liability. we need our senior leadership. we need a senior leadership to take it on. we have an opportunity to do so. we have a requirement to do so. at the foundation of national power is ultimately economic comment and in terms of global influence, in terms of the ability to support a military, the economic is
control took center stage during the half time show of a football game last night. and listen to what bob costas said in response it a murder-suicide over a kansas city player. >> handguns do not enhance our safety. exacerbate our flaws and tempt us into arguments and embracing confrontation rather than avoiding it. and here is what i believe if jovan belcher didn't possess a gun, he and cassandra perkins would both be alive today. stuart: we want to know what you think. go to our facebook page, weigh in, we value your opinion. and a top environmentalist, will a carbon tax will cause the glaciers from melting and temperatures from rising. his response in one second. >> announcer: you never know when, but thieves can steal your identity and turn your life upside down. >> hi. >> hi. you know, i can save you 15% today if you open up a charge card account with us. >> you just read my mind. >> announcer: just one little piece of information and they can open bogus accounts, stealing your credit, your money and ruining your reputation. to relentlessly protectelock what matters most... [beeping.
the fiscal cliff. this included chris van hollen. also, senators mark warner and bob corker, a republican from tennessee. this is one hour. >> good morning. i'm the head of bloomberg government. thank you for joining us today, and thank you to deloitte for partnering with us in this event. when we launched bloomberg government just about two years ago, we had the aspiration of creating a one-stop shop, with data, tools, news, and analysis to help government affairs and government sales professionals make better and faster decisions. we went a long way toward achieving that aspiration. a big part of it is conversations on the important issues that face our nation today, particularly at the intersection of business and government. today's discussion on the fiscal cliff clearly meets that. we are honored to have such a thoughtful panel. senator mark warner, senator bob corker, congressman chris van hollen, governor tim pawlenty, who is currently president and ceo of the financial services roundtable. moderating our discussion today is al hunt. we always love having al over here. he really pu
, bob? not today. [ male announcer ] bob has afib: atrial fibrillation not caused by a heart valve problem, a condition that puts him at greater risk for a stroke. [ gps ] turn left. i don't think so. [ male announcer ] for years, bob took warfarin, and made a monthly trip to the clinic to get his blood tested. but not anymore. bob's doctor recommended a different option: once-a-day xarelto®. xarelto® is the first and only once-a-day prescription blood thinner for patients with afib not caused by a heart valve problem, that doesn't require routine blood monitoring. like warfarin, xarelto® is proven effective to reduce the risk of an afib-related stroke. there is limited data on how these drugs compare when warfarin is well managed. no routine blood monitoring means bob can spend his extra time however he likes. new zealand! xarelto® is just one pill a day, taken with the evening meal. and with no dietary restrictions, bob can eat the healthy foods he likes. do not stop taking xarelto® rivaroxaban without talking to the doctor who prescribes it for you. stopping may increase yo
. >> it is me. >> number three, bob costas. did he cross the line? number five, the most outrageous royal prank ever. >> hello there. could i please speak to kate please, my granddaughter? >> this is piers morgan tonight. good evening. our big story tonight from what every one is talking about. washington's high-stakes game of "let's make a deal," to the royal prank called heard around the world. to bob costas talking about guns. and this shocking new york subway photograph. reports of chemical weapons in syria. let's get started with what promises to be a lively discussion. abbe huntsman, and a host of huff posts live. and welcome to you all. let's start with guns and the fallout of the murder and suicide of jovan bellcher and his girlfriend. bob costas of nbc spoke out about this. let's watch what he said tonight. >> i believe that there should be more comprehensive and effective controls on the sale of guns. roughly 40% of the guns purchased in this country do not require a background check for purchasing. i don't see any reason why someone should be able to purchase military style or body a
right, sharon, thank you very much. i'm here with bob and michael once again. bob, we will start with you. up 75 point on the dow jones. we still have the fed news conference to go, though. >> yeah, here is what is important. there is a tug-of-war going on between the stock market and book market. stocks love stimulus. infinite for stimulus. stim lut infinity. if you look at major sectors. big global gloej areas. industrials, materials, all of your energy stocks. all are kind of moving to the upside today. here is the problem. the bond mark set scared to death of the inflation implications of what the fed is doing today. so if you look at bond yields you will see a big move up in bond yields. if you look at the dollar, the dollar weakened because of course, stimulus means of course cheaper dollar over all. there is a real tug-of-war going on between the stock and bond market. >> we were talking earlier that bond market sees there is a finish line. once we have numbers pegged, they say, rates aren't going to be low forever. if the bond market sees unemployment at 6% or 6.99%, you
with you later in the program. >>> for now, we're joined by bob parker on set, senior adviser at credit suisse. bob, welcome. >> thank you. >> what do you make of this? is there any way that this is a positive in terms of perhaps opening the door towards mon at the monte serving in some sort of government? >>. >> i am assuming we're going to have a election probably in the second half of january. we're talking about a position of somewhere between 12 and 17% of the vote. so subsequently, i think fears that berlusconi may come back seem to be misplaced. i think if everyone looks at the last year and a half of what the monte government has achieved in italy, you have to be impressed. we have a strong budget climate surplus. the overall budget has come in dramatically. we've had well fare reform, pension reform. there's further work to be done on the competitiveness of italy. >> i can't tell you how much investors have been talking bullishly about italy. we know it's the eurozone's third biggest economy. obviously what happens in italy is important. they've been saying if anything the prob
that bob toll cited, 1.8 to 2.8 million households fewer since 2007 were formed and that's playing catchup. we should have the formation of those households unrolling now. >> i thought it was amazing. saying the optimism has to do with demographics and not the fiscal cliff. kimberly clarke talkeded abo ee decline in birth rates. i don't shop for diapers. >> i did. not long ago. >> are you out of it? >> tail end. >> such a nice thing. >> amazing statement by them saying, listen, not a lot of people are having kids. >> what about adult diapers? >> there is some household formation in the u.k. we'll get at least one new baby in the u.k. right? >> she's a smart person. i wasn't going sexist there. i know better than that. i'm not going over the sex cliff. >> she's fashionable. >> yes, she is. >> even i know she's fashionable. >> whatever she wears maternity wear, it will be a boost. >> does she go to gsw? i said that was discount. it's designer. and you've got to go there. >> there's one on 79th street. >> gorgeous store. you can go to whole foods and you can buy shoes. may i suggest you do th
. representative howard berman elected in 1982 and served 30 years from the 28th district. representative bob filner sworn in this month as mayor of san diego and served for 20 years. representative laura richardson served for five years from the 37th district. representative pete stark, outgoing dean of our delegation was elected in 1972 and served more than 40 wreers from the 13th district. representative lynn woolsey served for 20 years from the 6th congressional district. much kk said about the distinguished careers of our departing colleagues, but i would like to offer a few remarks of the work i have joined them during their time here in the congress. representative howard berman has served the house for 30 years and i was honored to name him among my closest friends in this body. during his service, he worked on a wide of variety of issues and known as a champion of human rights and standing up for middle class, working class and for the poor in our country. as chair of the foreign affairs committee from 2007 to 2008, mr. berman made great progress on behalf of the less fortunate. he w
bob moffett t chairman of both companies, mmr, owns a stake in pxp, board seats. it's related. >> and yet, ackerson, did we get hold of him? he's always been very pro shareholder. this is the most anti-shareholder. unless you're a very large shareholder. >> isn't he cynical? >> these guys are different, moffett and our man in chesapeake. >> thank you. they approach the world a little different. >> is it different from you? you're fitzgerald. >> i don't want to say cavalier, but they like to take risks, that's how they built their fortune in the first police, they all take risks. >> i thought if you bought freeport, you were trying to play the grassberg, big copper, the china thing, i didn't know i was getting involved in a high stakes poker match. >> yes. which is why you're selling. >> let's get to bob pisani who's on the floor watch what's moving. >> moffett wants the cash flow from freeport who helped finance the drilling for mcmoran drilling. why did they have to spend 70% premium to buy these things? if i wanted to buy them, i could have bought them a lot cheaper, i wante
's the chief of staff to governor bob macdonald. to denise northrop came from state of oklahoma where she is chief of staff to governor mary phalen and roxanne white is joining us from the great state of colorado where she's chief of staff to governor john hicken looper. and so their full bios are on the pamphlets and nare all very accomplished professionals in their careers. i'm going to ask roxanne to start and we can come down this way. >> great. first, thank you for the report. i think it provides a good framework for all of us as states to continue to look at the challenges facing us. we have been engaged in pension reform in colorado. our pension fund is about 69% solvent. we did major reform in the last administration. and we are now in court trying to defend that reform. our pension costs by 2020 will go to 22%. and so to give you a sense of how far behind we were as a state, if we lose in court and the battle is whether or not we as a state have a right to ratchet down the colas for our state employees, then we could see a need to go to 25% of compensation by 2020. so it's fairly
there are but to the regulations favor and how they impact everybody else. >> host: david rothkopf is our guest. bob in marina, california is the next caller. >> it is an honor to talk to you. i met you and some years back at the conference in monterey, california and i remember the educational challenges not only to reach the masses but also to educator the children of the superrich and that the blacks on route nadir at observation the only the superrich can save us. i would like to get an update on your take of the educational challenge we face by your analysis which i think is absolutely superb. you are really a beacon of light in the darkness for us all. >> host: >> guest: education is our biggest challenge, drive economic growth and we have an educational system that works on a model developed at the university of bologna in the year 800 where a guy stands in front of a rule of 800 and talk with them. and into every classroom using video and the internet. we need to recognize and education assistance designed for an agrarian era and give kids the summer of doesn't make sense and an educational system des
of pento portfolios, no idea where you are, and bob pisani on the floor of the new york stock exchange. what did you make, stephanie, of today's market action? you're the trader and follow the short-term swings. what was the message of the market do you think today? >> the message is the market is nothing is really going to change. interest rates will be low for an extended period of time. the fact that they tied the rates to unemployment, a little bit of a twist to the story, but it means that rates stay low. i think that the housing theme continues. i think that financials continue to work because even though you have a flat yield curve they are a beneficiary of the housing cycle, and away from all of this you focus on what happens internationally and china continues to recover. europe looks like it's stabilizing and we didn't change our strategy based on the news, just a little bit more of what you're doing. >> randy, anything change for you? >> no, not really. what we're watching is the parallels that occur now, where we stood with the fiscal cliff and where we stood in 1999 with t
. let me introduce myself, i'm bob oakes from morning edition on wbur, boston's npr news station. [applause] thank you. thank you. i'm sure some of you are saying, wow, that's bob oakes? [laughter] i thought he was taller -- [laughter] i thought he was thinner, i thought he had more hair. [laughter] and, you know, the funny thing is that all those things were true last week. [laughter] let me thank all of you for coming here this afternoon and thank the boston book festival for having us. don't they do a nice job? isn't this a terrific eventsome. >> yes. [applause] >> let's also thank the plymouth rock foundation for sponsoring this particular session and say that without their generosity, it would be hard to put on events like this that add to the cultural life that we all enjoy in this great city. so so thanks to them. [applause] and in a way that's what we're here to talk about this afternoon, the triumph of this city and all the cities, the triumph of the city, that's the title of harvard economics professor ed glaeser's book. it's about what's made cities around the world gr
boehner doesn't seem to have the power and grover does. >> the point, again, bob corker's pledge is not to me, it is to the voters of tennessee, that's the argument he's made again and again. if he wants to have a different conversation with the voters, that's his choice. >> why is corker the coolest man on earth? who does he play golf with? peyton manning. >> really? >> he's giving me all the big -- the minimum tax. i said, what are you up to this weekend? he said, i played golf with peyton manning. i said, are you kidding me? that seems to be more important to you than the fiscal cliff. >> 11-3? >> they still need home field advantage. >> they're competing for a first round play-off. what peyton has done is just amazing. steve liesman's exclusive with lacquer. one more look at futures this morning. we'll cover what 10% on squawk earlier today. and a lot more when "squawk on the street" comes right back. [ male announcer ] at scottrade, we believe the more you know, the better you trade. so we have ongoing webinars and interactive learning, plus, in-branch seminars at over 500 l
the audience through this. we have bob walk the audience through and i would like to start with a provocative opening comment that you make. you set my reporting over three decades has convinced me that we all need to recover a sensibility of time and space that has been lost in the information age when the molders of public opinion - against the hours that will to let them talk about the distinguished your times columnist tom friedman is labeled a flout world. instead little interest to readers to recruit decidedly unfashionable figures who will push of a heart against the notion that geography and a longer matters. so i want to just ask you to start with the basics of geography and tell us why the matter so decisively in the world. this is a pablumized by tom friedman's work greatly is what we can do is all the things. what i'm doing is saying find that human agency, that's fighting against things but what i'm showing you in this book is the other side, i'm not disagreeing with what they said but should i take back to the formidable barriers which if you do not respect you can never overcom
is unaccountable, saturday night at 10:00 eastern on "after words" on c-span2. >>> pennsylvania senator bob casey on syria's civil war. he spoke along with incoming house foreign affairs committee chair ed royce on iran's nuclear program. the foundation for defense of democracies hosted this event. >> welcome. welcome again to the foundation for the defense of democracies annual washington forum. my name is mark argosh and i'm a proud supporter of fdd. it brings me great pleasure to introduce another senior official doing great work on capitol hill. congressman ed royce currently chairs the subcommittee on terrorism, nonproliferation and trade. last week he was selected to be the next chairman of the house foreign affairs committee. congratulations, congressman, on this new and important role. [applause] >> thanks, mark, thank you very much. >> it's no surprise that congressman royce has been entrusted by his colleagues with the committee's gavel have. he stands consistently at the forefront at the fight against global terrorist groups that threaten the united states including al qaeda. in his un
to explain about that. plus, we have bob from jones day who specializes in wall street deal making. jeff, it is ammo on wall street to do things behind closed doors. you don't want word to get out on the negotiations. it gets too messy. >> right. i wouldn't advocate for a lot of people to do what wall street does. one thing you can say is they've helped facilitate thousands of mna deals this year. they've figured something out with these transactions. the deals that are most successful have the better chance of success are the ones that you negotiate behind closed doors, not the ones that turn into hostile battles and spill out into public, which is what we're seeing noup. >> i understand that, but at the same time, what wh are we going to have a deal already? people are so frustrated by this. we've had 13 months to think about. now we're down to 26 days. bob, can you really make a deal on the fiscal cliff when the negotiation is out in public? do you think we'll get a deal done? that's what everybody wants to know. >> if everybody thinks we ought to get to a deal, we'll get to a deal. t
's a question, though, willie, whether you want the job or not. >> right. >> i asked bob riley, i've said this 1,000 times, it seems extraordinarily important if you're a union member in the northeast, and like me, you want your factories running again. i asked bob riley, i don't understand, why did mercedes go to tuscaloosa county, alabama, instead of filling up the factories in connecticut? 15 minutes away from yale. or in rhode island. 20 minutes away from brown. i mean, right by some of the most highly trained, brilliant minds in the world. that's easy. the work force rules are so insane there, there's no way that mercedes or bmw or airbus would ever dream of going to those states. do you want the jobs or do you not want the jobs? >> and that plays out all over the south in harold's home state of tennessee, auto plant comes back, you get a bunch of jobs but at a very low wage. so the question is do you want to lower ourselves to the global standard of wages so that you have many more jobs -- >> that's a better option. >> that question has to be answered -- >> stronger middle class in union s
. >>> he is always outspoken on sports. bob costas touched a nerve within he spoke out on gun control earlier this month. find out what he's saying about that now, coming up. hing. and you really don't want to pay more than you have to. only citi price rewind automatically searches for the lowest price. and if it finds one, you get refunded the difference. just use your citi card and register your purchase online. have a super sparkly day! ok. [ male announcer ] now all you need is a magic carriage. citi price rewind. start saving at citi.com/pricerewind. till you finish your vegetables. [ clock ticking ] [ male announcer ] there's a better way... v8 v-fusion. vegetable nutrition they need, fruit taste they love. could've had a v8. or...try kids boxes! trust duracell to power their donated toys? duralock power preserve. it locks in power for up to 10 years in storage. guaranteed. duracell with duralock. trusted everywhere. up high! ok. don't you have any usefull apps on that thing? who do you think i am, quicken loans? ♪ at quicken loans, our amazingly useful mortgage calculator app
to the event with remarks from incoming chairman ed royce and senator bob casey and talking about syria and tensions in iran coming up in a few minutes. we will bring you a portion of the morning portion of the discussion at the foundation for defense of democracy. this segment and this panel discussion focused on the egyptian elections. >> good morning everyone. thank you, bob, for that introduction and thank you all of you for coming out early this morning for what i think will be a lively debate. we are going to be asking the question if democracy is to triumph in the middle east, victories at the ballot box are inavoidable and essential. this is the motion we will be debating in the intelligence-squared format per requests from our panelists who have done this once already -- they have had a practice round. they have not had a chance of doing this, but i suspect, had probably had several scotches and talked about ways to defeat their foes. we know that this is a time of revolution in the middle east. it started with a fruit sell seller in tunisia and toppled a 230-year dictator that
's bob costas created a controversy while talking about the kansas city chief player jovan belcher killing his girlfriend before taking his life. he says if belcher didn't have a gun he and cassandra would be alive and here he is trying to explain his comments on the o'reilly factor. >> i didn't call for any specific prohibition on guns and i voted from a column by jason whitlock and now on the fox supports website, in which he mentioned a gun culture in this country and it plays itself out in many ways, but it's about and toward guns that almost always leads to tragedy. >> not always leads to tragedy, in fact, mr. costas, i think you're a great sports caster, i really do, i thought you did a terrific job for the olympics, for the same reason i don't try to do commentary on sports you might want to do some brushing up on the facts before you comment on what you call the gun culture. here is the fact. over 4,000 times a day, in this country. 4,000 times a day, guns are use today prevent a crime by private citizens. in fact, there is 50 times more of a likelihood that a private citiz
have thought? i did. we did, bob. we did. got it. >>> paul o'neill may be best known as secretary of the treasury under president george w. bush, but it's a difficult call he made years before that that altered the course of a major american company and literally saved lives in the process. >> i can't say to you, you know, this is all one group or all another group. >> in 1987 o'neill became ceo of one of the largest and oldest aluminum companies in the world, alcoa. on the eve of its centennial, the storied corporation was in trouble. inefficient, rapid expansion had left profits dwindling and moral waning. putting o'neill in charge was a big change. in nearly 100 years, alcoa had never hired an out of house ceo. someone who had not climbed through the ranks of the tightly-knit management system and who was not well-versed in metal making. the company was in for a surprise with the first decision o'neill made. executives and shareholders thought it was bizarre, unorthodox, and indifferent to the bottom line. so what was that decision? let's find out. when you came to alcoa, descr
tonight they may vote on of this cliff package. senator bob corker saying that the vote is likely, highly likely. senators need to step back and soak up the details of this plan. details of the plan i that the bush tax cuts for people earning $400,000 singles or four under and 50,000 as couples, people who are at that level and more will see those tax hikes go into place. people earning less than that will get a reprieve and not have to pay higher taxes. it would also put in place at two month delay on the sequestered. that is an increase in spending on defense. we could get as in a bill tonight. you will continue to follow the story as it breaks. we're following every twist and turn because it means so much to your wallet. meanwhile, the stock market rallying today on the last day of trading for 2012. the dow. largely on the fiscal cliff. ending the year up 7% which begs the question where we had in 2013 and how you should position yourself. here with their own outlook, one more bullish than the other, editor of money news all to the wealth report and portfolio manager. all-star with you
?margin. don't be modest, bob. you found a better way to pack a bowling ball. that was ups. and who called ups? you did, bob. i just asked question. it takes a long time to pack a bowling ball. the last guy pitched more ball packers. but you... you consulted ups. you found a better way. that's logistics. that's margin. find out what else ups knows. i'll do that. you're on a roll. that's funny. i wasn't being funny, bob. i know. ♪ ♪ [ male announcer ] everyone deserves the gift of all day pain relief. this season, discover aleve. all day pain relief with just two pills. with odor free aspercreme. powerful medicine relieves pain fast, with no odor. so all you notice is relief. aspercreme. . >>> as promised let's take a look at the rest of the top ten most intriguing people you selected for 2012. here's again, brooke baldwin. >> reporter: number five, super jumper felix baumgartner. let's face it, he did what no human has ever done, diving 24 miles from the edge of space. >> under way. >> breaking the sound barrier along the way. >> i'm still the same guy. but as soon as you start traveling p
sons, mark, bob, john and david, and the entire lugar family, most of which is with us here in the galleries today. their strength and sacrifices have been indispensable to my public service. i'm also very much indebted to a great number of talented and loyal friends who have served with me in the senate, including, by my count, more than 300 senators, hundreds of personal and committee staff members, and more than a thousand student interns. in my experience, it is difficult to conceive of a better platform from which to devote one's self to public service and the search for solutions to national and international problems. at its best, the senate is one of the founders' most important creations. a great deal has been written recently about political discord in the united states, with some commentators judging that partisanship is at an all-time high. having seen quite a few periods in the congress when political struggles were portrayed in this way, i hesitate to describe our current state as the most partisan ever, but i do believe that as an institution, we have not live
to avoid the sequestration. >> bob samuelson, "washington post". i think the proposals are to reduce the marine corps by 20,000, and the army by 80,000 from their peaks, and there's much speculation thamuch speculr cuts in the pentagon budget would reduce the additional cuts in both the army and the marines. if the marines was put in a position where it had to occupy and protected the oil field of the persian gulf for an extended period of time say five or six years are those forces adequate to do the job? >> one of the reasons at least i was able to get through as chairman is to try not to speculate much on hypothet speculate much on hypothetical. the reductions in both the army and the marine corps have been in the budget now, and i think they are in the 13 budget, so basically they have been on the hill, the beginning of them they have been on the hill for the better part of a year and they are reductions both of chiefs of those to services and the chairman also. clearly, and i did as well when i was the chairman over year ago, there was a need to come down. there was an expectati
that as well as the american people. a lot can happen. just as bob said it -- i said in my remarks that the tax issue could get resolved this weekend or it could get resolved at the beginning of next year. it will get resolved. almost all americans will not pay higher taxes next year. but it could happen this weekend. >> the meeting ends today, if there is a proposal put on the table, we're hearing about smaller-scale proposals to get enough republican support in the senate, and not just get 60 votes. do you need an estate tax -- is it ok if it's just different income and unemployment? >> it would be best to let senator mcconnell and others meet with the president today and have them talk about that in private. probably the meeting that happens today is more for optics and probably the substance occurs after that when staff begins to talk. they ought to work on that together, and i think it is best for me not to comment on what should or should not be in it. i want to come back to this -- the 112th congress has scored, litigated, debated every one of the issues that lamar and i are talking abou
. the have to find common ground. host: bob is on the line from chapel hill, north carolina. caller: two specific questions. does your trillion dollar increase come from status scoring versus dynamic scoring? there is some growth that comes out of the base broadening. on social security, do you adjust the inflation annually? lastly, a little history. i know the set was trying to do something with the commission in 2008-2009. they fail to pass it. -ba- -- they failed to pass it. the hypocrisy did not go both ways. i think history would help people understand the importance of simpson-bowles. guest: you're absolutely right. there have been several proposals. they are creating a commission that have the authority to come up with a plan. this was a bipartisan bill that was in the senate. it failed. the alternative was the aha president by executive order established simpson-bowles. the leadership in congress soft agreed that if simpson-bowles got 14 members to vote yes then the recommendations would be put up for consideration and some sort of expedited fashion. it became a non issue. the pr
morning. >> host: good morning, bob. >> caller: question. this is a topic that nobody wants to talk about. the interest-rate cut the interest that is paid on the national debt. presently most of our debt is under short term, under 1%. and it's manipulated, of course, by the federal reserve and treasury department. so it's going to go from say 250 billion interest payments up to 7%, the next several years. one half trillion dollars in interest annually on the national debt. wondering, how is that going to impact our military industrial complex in the near future when that actually comes to be? >> that clearly -- the ticking time bomb for any part of the federal government and probably because of. [indiscernible] , the state government. we are in a time of unusually low interest rates. it will continue for a time, but when they rise it is going to be a body blow to the national politics and the country because, as your caller was indicating, the jump from 1% to 7% is such a massive increase in taxes that the only thing i can think of is, can you say greece? >> host: what does it mean for th
we are heading in the same direction. thank you and have a wonderful new year. host: a tear from bob now in the democrat light. caller: thank you for letting me have a chance to speak. i am more optimistic -- i a more pessimistic than optimistic. i just do not think they will ever get together like they should. my one comment is when they start speaking about the cuts and the entitlements, the always a social security, medicare, medicaid. that is not the only entitlements. every government program that has a retirement benefit, a health-care benefit, those are entitlements, two, up to and including the entitlements for the congressman. let's be fair. when they start talking about entitlements and hold it to those three items, let's hold their feet to the fire and make them talk about entitlements for the other folks, too. host: appreciate you calling this morning. donna writes about this on twitter. if that to facebook here. -- back to you facebook here. budget showdown hits the keep week. that is of the front page reminding us of the deadline looming. it is a bloomberg story here ou
to the mid 30s. bob dole in the midst of the anti-immigrant sentiment of the 1990s took it back below 30. george w. bush got it back up to the magic 40% that karl rove thought was the jumping off point for neutralizing all of these questions. so, you know, we're talking about a fairly small margin of voters here. so, if you -- you know, a 10% shift in the latino votes moving 1 million to 1.3 million, you know, the actual -- what the turnout is, we don't really know yet. it's going to take a while. the exit poll numbers are losing credibility as time goes on, but that's -- i don't want to get too -- >> yes. >> you know, geeky with you [laughter] a shift to a million voters, million and a half voters, and romney would have been in the mid 30s in terms of his share, and everybody would have said, "that was a pretty good night for a republican." now, what would have happened in terms of actual states, i knew you were going to ask that -- [laughter] >> and then i want to go down the row, getting everyone. >> it's interesting, because it doesn't -- it would have -- i'll leave it to the pundits
on unemployment insurance that they're no longer employable at all. host: bob receives unemployment insurance. tell us about your situation. caller: i'm a single-earner, and thank god i have made a good living. assuming i could get a job, and nothing against the folks at fast food or nothing like that, but if you were making a minimum amount of money, with my situation, i would be in the street using that job. i could not pay my bills. i am not talking about luxuries. i rent. i would not be able to pay that. thank god unemployment insurance is geared to what you used to make, so that, and by the way, i am in my 60's. it is not easy. without that amount coming in that is based on what i used to make, i would not be able to survive. i would be industry. -- in the street. host: mr. josh bivens, a chance on this one. guest: that points out that unemployment insurance is a form of social insurance. people take lower wages because the employer has to pay tax. they pay into the system while things are going well, and if they hit a rough spot they hit a benefit that somewhat match its previous earnin
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